• COMPANION ANIMAL ROUND TABLE – WAYS OUT OF A CRUEL DEADLY MAZE

    29th February 2016

    Companion animal roundtable.

    After several months of planning including meetings with and visits to a number of rescue groups, our office held Companion Animal Roundtable on the 26th February at Parliament House. The purpose of the Roundtable was to consult with 16d and other grassroots rescue groups to discuss “Ways Out Of A Cruel Deadly Maze”- the theme of Mark’s inspiring introductory speech.

    The Roundtable highlighted the problems of oversupply of companion animals including stray and surrendered animals, high kill-rates in pounds and shelters and the need to improve re-homing rates. We noted that the system for protecting the well-being of these animals is BROKEN, and that rescue groups were very much a successful part of the solution for solving these issues.

    We discussed ways of supporting free-living animals such as colony cats and considered calls for an extension of the definition of companion animals to include horses, chickens, guinea pigs rabbits and others. Education of the general public, carers, rangers and pound staff was also identified as a high priority. Funding, better resources and greater recognition for animal rescue groups was seen as crucial in supporting their work, as well as dismantling barriers within the local government bureaucracy that prevents 16d groups from accessing and re-homing animals that are otherwise abandoned on death row.

    From here our office will be developing a framework for legislative and policy reform with input from selected stakeholders, including consultation with the RSCPA and the Animal Welfare League.

    From Mark and his staff we truly appreciate all those that participated and made the event a success. This is the vital first step that has been long overdue towards finding the way out of the cruel deadly maze.

    Mark Pearson making his introductory speech to attendees of the Companion Animal Roudtable held by our office

    Mark Pearson making his introductory speech to attendees of the Companion Animal Roudtable held by our office

  • ANOTHER MILESTONE FOR ANIMALS IN THE NSW PARLIAMENT

    25th February 2016

    So the first week back for the NSW Legislative Council is done and a historic one it has been. On Tuesday, three separate political parties gave notice of bills that will positively affect animals. The Animal Justice Party gave notice of a bill to ban animal research on primates, Greens NSW a bill to create an Independent Animal Protection Authority,  and NSW Labor a bill to enable inspectors to remove dogs and cats from animal breeding establishments (puppy farms).

    Please watch my video blog for all the great updates including the Koala Park Sanctuary and dolphin petition.

    Thanks for the support!

  • ILLEGAL HUNTING – MORE FUNDING NEEDED FOR RURAL CRIME INVESTIGATORS

    28th January 2016

    Mark Pearson has previously warned that the number one concern for farmers is illegal hunting trespass, with research backing his claim. The terrible story today of dogs in the firing line is just another example of when the situation escalates to the point of a physical altercation between hunter and farmer.

    800-IMG_9805j-mark-Pearson-M-P“Since being elected to the NSW upper house last year, my office has received a steady stream of calls from distressed and angry landholders about illegal hunting on their properties.

    Callers describe the lawlessness of weekend warriors entering remote properties and shooting anything that moves. I have heard stories of bullets flying in all directions and the terrible suffering of animals with hunting dogs left for dead after sustaining injuries from wild pigs. One landowner was devastated to discover dozens of dead and dying native animals such as kangaroos, wombats and even echidnas after a night of blasting away by booze-fueled thugs.”

    It is time for the Minister for Police, Troy Grant, to provide additional resources to Rural Crime investigators so that they can stamp out this appalling illegal hunting before it takes a greater toll on human and animal life.

    See the full MEDIA RELEASE

  • PAWS AND RECOVER

    27th May 2015

    Notice of motion.

    PAWS AND RECOVER

    Motion by the Hon. Dr PETER PHELPS, on behalf of the Hon. MARK PEARSON, agreed to:

    (1)     That this House acknowledges and congratulates Senior Constable Jaqui Largo, Kings Cross Police Service, on her outstanding work in establishing and running Paws and Recover, a not-for-profit organisation that assists homeless people living on the streets to care for their companion animals that are often their one and only friend.

    (2)     That this House notes that:

    (a)     Paws and Recover networks with police, ambulance, emergency and mental health services in cases where animals are abandoned or would be left behind after domestic violence intervention, emergency, accident, health and mental health problems; and

    (b)     during the week of 18 May 2015 Paws and Recover was able to arrange an animal carer for a 90-year-old woman living alone with her companion dog so that she was able to be admitted to hospital for an operation to remove cancer.

    (3)     That this House acknowledges and congratulates the more than 70 volunteers, including police officers, who assist with this compassionate and very necessary service which contributes to the wellbeing of vulnerable members of the community and their “best mates”.

  • FUNDING FOR ANIMAL RESCUE ORGANISATIONS

    10th November 2015

    Questions without notice.

    IMPOUNDED DOGS AND CATS

    The Hon. MARK PEARSON: My question is directed to the Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight, representing the Minister for Local Government. In 2013-14 more than 20,000 impounded dogs and cats were killed by local councils and the RSPCA. Given that section 64(5) of the Companion Animals Act states that councils have a duty to consider alternatives to killing, by what accountability mechanism does the Minister satisfy himself that councils are responsibly exercising that duty? And given that the Office of Local Government figures show that approved rescue groups under section 16(d) rehomed close to 8,000 animals rescued from death row last year, will the Minister explain why these organisations receive no funding from government?

    The Hon. DUNCAN GAY: I thank the honourable member for his question. It is a question of great detail which I will refer to my colleague the Minister for Local Government. I do remember, however, recently he asked me why we had not done something about the NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service [WIRES] signs and when I checked, they were not our signs, they were WIRES’ signs. We need to check on this and I will take the question in good faith and pass it on to the Minister for a detailed answer.


    To date (4th February 2018) no response has ever been received.

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