• Companion Animal Action Paper 2017

    After eighteen months of consultations with animal rescue groups, advocacy groups and individuals,  I have now finalised my Companion Animal Action Paper. It is the  blueprint for the work I will be undertaking in parliament.

    Of course, there are more issues that will need to be considered over time (for example,  companion animals other than cats and dogs,  transport of companion animals, use of public space, tenants with animals, penalties for cruelty) but there is plenty to be getting on with in my first term in parliament.

    I would like to thank everyone for their contributions, your expertise and input has been invaluable.

    Download the full Action Paper HERE

  • Notice of Motion-National Volunteers Week

    National Volunteers Week

    This Motion was OBJECTED to by the Government.

    1. That this House, in recognition of National Volunteers Week, honours the selfless and compassionate work undertaken by the hundreds of volunteers in NSW, who give generously of their time in caring for injured wildlife, rescued companion animals and provide sanctuary to farmed animals.
    2. That this House congratulates animal carer volunteers for their commitment in providing care and comfort to animals that would otherwise have died, either through neglect, abuse or being killed in council pounds and RSPCA shelters.
  • Notice of Motion-Yulin Dog Meat Fesitval

    Yulin Dog Meat Fesitval

    This Motion was OBJECTED to by the Government.

    1. That this House condemns the celebration of the Lychee and Dog Meat Festival, commonly referred to as Yulin Dog Meat Festival, which is an annual summer solstice event held in Yulin, Guangxi, China.
    2. That this House notes that the festival only commenced in 2009 and includes activities such as dogs being confined in cages, then beaten, skinned and boiled alive to produce dogmeat which is then consumed by festival goers.
    3. That this House calls upon the Chinese Government to prohibit this egregious cruelty to animals by banning the torture of dogs and consumption of dogmeat at the Yulin Festival.
    4. That this House notes that in NSW it is not unlawful for dogs and cats to be killed and consumed by humans provided the slaughtering process meets the requirements of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1979
  • Question Without Notice-RSPCA staffing levels over holiday periods

    Many reports from the community come to our office about dissatisfaction with the RSPCA and their obligations to investigate and prosecute animal welfare laws.

    With the recent heat wave over the holiday period, and a period where many companion animals are placed into boarding facilities and companion animals suffer greatly, it appears the RSPCA are not protecting animals inline with community expectations. The NSW Police put on extra staff to accommodate the so called silly season, yet the RSPCA winds back their inspectorate staffing levels. How can this be justified?

    Mark Pearson asked the Minister as to whether he is monitoring the RSPCA’s work under the law to properly meet their obligations in regards to animal welfare laws in NSW. We hope both the Minister and the RSPCA take these concerns seriously and provide the community with a detailed response.

    RSPCA STAFFING LEVELS

    The Hon. MARK PEARSON: My question without notice is directed to the Hon. Niall Blair, Minister for Primary Industries, Minister for Regional Water, and Minister for Trade and Industry.

    Over the summer period there was animal suffering and deaths caused by heat stress, dehydration and starvation in council pounds and boarding kennels. Unlike the NSW Police, which rostered on additional officers during this busy holiday time, the RSPCA reduced the number of inspectors on duty, resulting in delays and animals being left at risk of harm during this critical time.

    Given that the statutory obligation to investigate and enforce our animal welfare laws is a year-round responsibility and overseen by the Minister, what steps does the Minister’s department take to monitor the availability of RSPCA inspectors to discharge their duties under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act?

    The Hon. NIALL BLAIR: I thank the Hon. Mark Pearson for his question. Obviously, as we have heard many times in this House, the member has a particular interest in the RSPCA and its actions—or, in his view, its lack of action at times. I know he has a particular history with the RSPCA. Nonetheless, the member has asked an important question. It is obviously very much an operational matter as to how the RSPCA schedules the number of officers on duty and when it does that.

    The Hon. Mark Pearson also referred to the role that my agency plays in relation to liaising with the RSPCA, in particular for the parts of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act that it is responsible for. In light of the level of operational detail that the member has asked for in his question, I will refer the question back to my department and I will take it on notice. I will seek an answer, and I may need to liaise with the RSPCA as part of that answer, and come back to the member with a detailed response

  • Notice of Motion commending the tireless work of Anna Ludvik, founder of Lucy’s Project

    I recently attended the ‘Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence International Perspectives’ conference held in Sydney hosted by Lucy’s Project. I left so inspired by the great work Anna Ludvik and Lucy’s Project are doing to raise the awareness and educate about an area of domestic violence not often spoken about. To read more about Lucy’s Project please visit their website and like the Facebook page.

    lucys-project-logo-2015

    NOTICE OF MOTION

    1. That this House commends Anna Ludvik, founder of Lucy’s Project, for her work in raising awareness of the issue of animal abuse victims of domestic violence.
    2. That this House notes that at the recent ‘Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence International Perspectives’ conference held in Sydney hosted by Lucy’s Project international guest speaker, Allie Phillips from Sheltering Animals and Pets Together (SAF-T), USA, spoke about the bond between companion animals and human victims of domestic violence, citing the example of Hank, a Great Dane who shielded his female guardian McKenzie from a brutal attack by her
      partner, noting that:
      (a) Hank was honoured for his courage and bravery by the Humane Society of the United States receiving the Valor Dog of the Year and People’s Hero award at the Fifth Annual Dogs of Valor Awards,
      (b) Hank threw himself on top of McKenzie when her partner began attacking her with a hammer, in order to protect McKenzie from the blows,
      (c) the partner then began attacking Hank, beating the dog, throwing him from the porch by the neck,
      (d) McKenzie escaped and called the police who arrived to arrest the partner and found Hank still alive but suffering a broken hip and ribs,
      (e) McKenzie sought refuge at the Rose Brooks Center but when she learned she could not bring Hank with her, she refused to go until the Centre agreed to change its ‘no animals’ policy,
      (f) as a response to the story of Hank, the Rose Brooks Center shelter is building a wing that will house the companion animals of victims of domestic violence, and
      (g) Susan Miller, CEO of Rose Brooks Center, has said: ‘Families need to have a safe place to escape to, a place that welcomes the entire family including pets’.
    3. That this House acknowledges that many human victims of domestic violence are unable to leave abusive partners and seek safety due to the difficulty in finding emergency shelters or rental accommodation that provide housing for companion animals.
Page 1 of 41234