• Question Without Notice-Lannate L Insecticide

    On our recent visit to Broken Hill where I hosted a community forum, some alarming reports of animal cruelty and abuse were conveyed to myself and my staff. One of the more distressing issues was that of farmers and landholders using Lannate L insecticide, a highly dangerous schedule seven chemical, to poison wild animals, including wild dogs, foxes and wedge tail eagles. Reports of even insect eating animals such as birds and echidnas dying from consuming ants that have landed on Lannate L baited carcassess has sparked serious community concern.

    I questioned the Minister on this issue and it seems he has forgotten that he is the person responsible for animal welfare in this state. Whether an animal is native or not is irrelevant, the issue here is the unauthorised use of a highly dangerous poison on wild animals which causes immense suffering and a slow lingering death.

    Question

    My question is directed to the Minister for Primary Industries. At my recent community forum in Broken Hill I was told that it was common practice for landholders to purchase Lannate L, a schedule 7 insecticide, known colloquially as “Magic” because if used undiluted on a carcass it will kill anything. I was told of a sheep farmer who killed 60 wedge-tailed eagles in one week.

    Will the Minister advise whether the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority has approved the use of Lannate L for wild animal control?

    If not, will the Minister direct his department to investigate this unauthorised and cruel use of a schedule 7 poison?

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    Answer

    Some components of this question relate to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority [APVMA], which is a Federal body. The wedge-tailed eagle, which is a native bird, component probably falls under the jurisdiction of the Minister for the Environment. If the question also relates to other pest animals species it may be relevant to my portfolio. What chemicals can be used for agricultural purposes and not for pest management is a responsibility for the APVMA. In good faith, I will take the question on notice and provide the Hon. Mark Pearson with information that is directly relevant to my portfolio rather than taking up too much time of the House now.

  • Adjournment speech on the brutality, cruelty of the kangaroo meat industry & the betrayal of our National symbol

    I draw to the attention of the House the betrayal of the national symbol of Australia—the internationally recognised totem for Australia, the kangaroo—here on the Coat of Arms in our House, the Legislative Council, the Coat of Arms in the other place, the Legislative Assembly, and on the Coat of Arms of the Federal Parliament. The ultimate betrayal of kangaroos is undertaken every night in Australia when a beautiful, soft, gentle and harmless herbivore is hunted down and slaughtered in their thousands. It is the largest routine slaughter of a land-dwelling wild animal on earth. And for what reason?

    In the main it is their perceived conflict with agribusiness. This has led to a dirty and ugly pet food industry; but, moreover, a filthy, out-of-control, misleading and deceptive human consumption industry, for both domestic and export consumption. It is the dirty and dark secret of the Great South Land that is second only in scale of abuse and brutality to the treatment of the First Peoples, the Indigenous people of Australia. Analyses of carcasses and the meat that is in supermarkets and retail outlets, and analyses by countries of import such as Russia, have led to their own findings that this is a dirty and filthy industry. Contaminants such as E. coli, salmonella, faeces, antibiotic spray and rotting meat caused Russia to implement a ban in 2008, through to 2009, and then finally crown it in 2012. China is refusing to accept kangaroo meat, despite numerous applications by governments to do so. Europe is commencing its own analysis of imports of kangaroo products. Holland has put forward a motion and is preparing a bill to be the first member country to implement a ban on kangaroo meat.

    I approached Minister Speakman to refer this industry, after 22 years of no overview or review, to the relevant committee, but he refused. I will obtain the agreement of three committee members to have the committee undertake an inquiry into the New South Wales kangaroo management program—not plan, but program. No rock will be left unturned. Not one slaughter operation, not one bludgeoned joey, not one retrieved decapitated head will be ignored in the inquiry’s penetrating and forensic analysis of what has been up until now an unaccountable but bloody disgusting industry. For the first time light will be shed on a critical and fundamental, but completely ignored, fact that has been dismissed with contempt and disrespect: The profound Indigenous connection with this animal, the malu, or kangaroo.

    If the next kangaroo management program is signed off next December or January by the State and Federal Ministers for the environment, it will be challenged by the Indigenous people in the Federal Court and no doubt will go all the way to the High Court. The mass slaughter of kangaroos, which is sanctioned by the second people of Australia, is the mass slaughter of an animal that is a totem to many Indigenous people, central to their spiritual relationship with land and water and, moreover, intricately interwoven into the complex laws and lores of the First Peoples. If industry and governments ignore the slaughter and significance of kangaroos, the Indigenous people will have no option—which was the case with Mabo—but to go to the judiciary and, inevitably, the highest court in the land to seek the help of the courts in protecting those misunderstood and abused animals.

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  • A victory for greyhounds!

    Its is final, the Greyhound Prohibition Bill 2016 presented by the Mike Baird government passed in the Legislative Assembly at 3:45 AM Wednesday 24th of August 2016. Since the announcement by Mike Baird and Troy Grant that the government would shut down the greyhound industry in response to the finding of the Commission of Inquiry Report, the industry ramped up their defence propaganda in an effort to spook the government into back down. To their credit the government did not back down, it in fact presented a measured and solid bill to Parliament for the orderly closure of the industry. Whilst their is some minor concerns, the message had to be sent-we support this governments brave, but right decision.  The future suffering of unborn greyhounds has been prevented and as we celebrate the end of this vile industry, no doubt all of us are thinking about those animals that were needlessly and brutally killed. For all those greyhounds, possums, piglets, kittens and chickens, we are sorry that you could not be saved. May we remain vigilant and committed to ending animal suffering when ever and where ever it occurs. Our immediate task now is to ensure that promises are kept and the orderly process of re-homing begins. Thank you to everyone who made this victory possible.

    The NSW Labor party, under the leadership of a seemingly cold Luke Foley on the other hand decided to make this decision their defining moment. Luke Foley and NSW Labor’s opposition to the ban is very disappointing, more so, that they have pledged to overturn the ban if elected in 2019. It seems any real interest that Labor indicated they had in animal wellbeing comes a long second in a chance to score political points. This was evident in the tactics Labor employed in both houses during the debate. In the Legislative Council, members constantly objecting and causing a division and vote at every step. In the Legislative Assembly, Labor leader Luke Foley’s marathon 3 hour speech in reply causing the final vote occurring at 3.45 in the morning.

    My second reading debate speech to the bill can be found HERE

  • Greyhound Prohibition Bill 2016 second reading debate speech

    The Animal Justice Party overwhelmingly supports the Greyhound Racing Prohibition Bill 2016. Last year I was asked to assist with developing a strategy after unfortunate evidence was gathered over several months in relation to live baiting. The training of greyhounds routinely involves a great deal of live baiting. Many trainers would arrive at a training track with various species—rabbits, possums, cats and piglets. One particular scene has haunted me ever since. It was not a one-off incident; it is systemic, it is part of the industry, it is the norm and it is integral to the industry. In broad daylight a possum, which is a nocturnal animal, was strapped to a lure. A cloth was placed over its shoulders and it was strapped down firmly by its lower legs. The only part of its body it could move was its tail. Owners paid $50 to train their dogs using that live bait.

    The lure was set off, with engines roaring, screaming and vibrating. This nocturnal animal was sped around the track. When it was stopped, the dogs were allowed to tear and rip at it. It then came back around to the start. The possum was kicked around and hit to see whether it was conscious. If it was still alive it was sent around again with other dogs. A possum that came back conscious would emit a very high-pitched squeal—as do kittens, piglets and rabbits, believe it or not, when suffering and in enormous distress. The possum to which I refer went around the track 23 times, and it was still conscious. If the owner of the dog was satisfied with the live baiting episode and the possum was still alive he could have his $50 refunded because the animal could be used for the next dog. The possum would be left there to die a long, lingering death—the police described it as torture.

    Justice McHugh subpoenaed 10 trainers to give evidence to the inquiry. Nine of them said—they could have lied but they did not—that they used live baiting to various degrees, and one refused to answer the question but certainly did not deny it. Therein lies the savagery of the greyhound industry. It is not a minority of trainers; it is not a one-off incident. Nine out of 10 trainers admitted to live baiting and that means the industry cannot save itself from itself.

    No regulator can save it from itself. The Government has rightfully decided that no government can save the industry from itself. That is why the Animal Justice Party and I personally overwhelming support the Baird Government in taking this historic, principled and ethical decision.

    The greyhound industry has a long history both here and afar. It is a history built on animal cruelty that traces the “sport” from the traditions of the elite and royalty to the “battlers’ sport” that it is portrayed as today. Its long history is important as it coincides with the dynamic shift of social and community expectation regarding our relationships with animals. It is clear that the industry has formulated its own demise, no doubt carrying innocent casualties with it of both the human and non-human kind. The industry and its core participants have ignored society’s shift regarding animals and their treatment. The shift places high expectations of those seeking to profit from animals and transcends political persuasions and socio-economic backgrounds. To pigeonhole love for animals as elitist and snobbery is an insult to working class everyday people, many of whom will take in a rescued greyhound as owners seek to dispose of them in the coming months when they no longer bring in revenue.

    It has been a widely known secret that the greyhound industry has systemic animal welfare issues. It is critical to note that those issues are systemic, not rare or in the minority. Stories of live baiting, mass graves, greyhound muscle men and over breeding have been common for a very long time. There has been a great deal of evidence about greyhound muscle men, which I will explain. When a greyhound has an injury it is very rarely taken to a vet or has a vet called for it. Instead, a decision is made to immediately breach a section of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act that says it is an offence to fail to provide veterinary treatment. A greyhound muscle man is called in. People who have been in the industry have given clear descriptions of what muscle men do. If a dog has gathered a serious injury while racing and cannot perform the muscle men will try various practices. One of them is to strap the front two legs of a dog to a high tree branch and then stretch the bottom two legs to try to rectify the injury. No analgesia or pain relief is given while the muscle men do the job. That practice is systemic in the industry.

    In my previous job I was privy to a large amount of evidence but not enough to bring about prosecutions at the level required. It was only in early 2015 that the evidence exposed in the Four Corners broadcast “Making A Killing” that I unfortunately witnessed as I assisted in obtaining that evidence for the program and the police. The exposé documented what has been spoken about a great deal today. The important thing is the program was the catalyst for the establishment of the commission of inquiry. It utilised covert video footage of the most appalling cruelty and suffering obtained by animal activists—those passionate everyday people exposing acts which the government, authorities and the industry could not or would not investigate and rectify. This is a testament to the everyday people who seek to right the wrongs of this world, which include those committed to voiceless animals beholden to our care that have suffered at the hands of callous people who knowingly committed illegal activity day in and day out.

    Thanks to the Government and the commission of inquiry led by Michael McHugh the public and the lawmakers of this State—and, indeed, across the globe—have had the truth revealed to them. I repeat that it is truth. The facts contained in the report by a conservative and esteemed former judge are not fictional or delusional. The bare facts as revealed by the McHugh report are that this industry has implicitly condoned as well as caused the unnecessary deaths of tens of thousands of healthy greyhounds, engaged in the barbaric practice of live baiting, and caused and will continue to cause injuries to greyhounds that range from minor to catastrophic. An enormous amount of catastrophic injuries will occur as a direct consequence of the genetic musculoskeletal structure of the animal as well as the race. Those things are fundamental to the industry and cannot be turned around. They are part of the industry and cannot be changed; however, they are unacceptable.

    The McHugh report also found that the industry has deceived the community concerning the extent of injuries and deaths caused during race meetings and it has failed to demonstrate that in the future it will be able to reduce the deaths of healthy greyhounds to levels the community could tolerate. I am sure many in the House will debate the finer points of the economics, jobs and the complexities that come with making such a tough but brave and just decision to shut down an industry. As a member of the Animal Justice Party I will discuss a few other aspects of this industry.

    The greyhound racing industry likes to claim that greyhounds are an ancient breed of racing dog going back to biblical days, with thousands of year of adaptation. Modern genetic testing shows differently. In fact, greyhounds are descended from herding dogs such as the St Bernard and the wolfhound, hardly known for their light frames or speed. The selection process is relatively recent, being only a few hundred years old. Breeding selection intensified with the commercialisation of the industry, placing considerable pressures on the greyhound’s musculoskeletal structure. Modern greyhounds have been bred for larger muscle mass, lower body fat and a higher overall muscle-to-bone ratio than other canine breeds. This intensive breeding selection has resulted in significant animal welfare issues for a large numbers of animals.

    Greyhounds have been shown to suffer from osteochondrosis dissecans, a genetic predisposition causing growth plate fracture in young dogs and hock joint fractures in adult dogs. Hock joint fractures are extremely common injuries experienced during racing. Injuries to the carpal and tarsal joints are also common in racing greyhounds, resulting in an increased risk of osteoarthritis and potential long-term lameness. Risk factors cited are heredity, rapid growth, anatomic conformation, trauma and dietary imbalances. Of these, heredity and conformation have been scientifically supported.

    The fact is and always will be that in order for the industry to exist greyhounds must be bred in excess to replace the dogs existing and to maintain race participation numbers. Greyhounds that do not participate in the greyhound racing industry have a life expectancy of between 12 and 15 years. For the industry’s greyhounds, the life expectancy is often far shorter. Many are put down before the age of 4½ years. That is another systemic blight on the industry. Over the past 12 years approximately 97,783 greyhounds were whelped in New South Wales. The McHugh report found, after taking into consideration a multitude of factors, that up to 68,000 of those dogs had been slaughtered simply because they were either too slow or could no longer pay their way.

    We cannot tolerate an industry that kills that many dogs because they do not make the grade. What was their fate? Appalling brutality and suffering. If they were lucky it was a bullet to the skull and a mass grave; the unlucky ones got baseball bats to the skulls and put into a crab trap and thrown into a river. In the 2014 committee inquiry into the industry evidence was also given that unwanted dogs were drowned, gassed and hung in New South Wales by Australian trainers and breeders.

    From the age of 12 months the training process commences with a “breaking-in” process—sometimes referred to as “education”. Breaking-in involves an intensive form of training during which the animal first learns to chase a lure. In many cases the lure used is a live animal termed “bait”. This widespread and rampant practice has been a criminal offence since 1979. The animal used for bait is often a terrified rabbit, possum, piglet or kitten. It also harms the welfare of those so deeply involved in an industry that has at its fundamental core systemic brutality and cruelty to animals.

    On the Four Corners program we saw—and I saw the complete video—children as young as 10 shown to be unwilling witnesses to this appalling treatment of animals. Members will recall a child being held by the hand and made stand in front of a possum upon which three greyhounds were set. The possum was torn to pieces. This is obviously common practice; how can it be welfare for those people? This bill is not only about the animal issue—dogs, possums, rabbits, piglets, cats, et cetera—but it is also about bringing people into a better way of compassionate living and children not being exposed to brutalities upon animals.

    Since 2007, despite the best efforts of volunteer-run greyhound rescue and rehoming groups across the State, Greyhound Racing NSW has only rehomed 593 greyhounds through its Greyhounds As Pets program, at a cost of $200,000 per year. That is unacceptable. Justice McHugh put it simply when he said:

    The greyhound is simply a gambling instrument, no different from a card in a poker game or a handle on a poker machine.

    This bill is a historic document and one that will end a cruel industry in an ordered manner which I support. I commend Mike Baird for his leadership in reviewing the report and evidence, and making the difficult yet right decision to introduce the bill. I strongly commend the bill to the House.

  • Broken Hill Animal Protection Forum

    UPDATE!

    As per our public agenda that we distributed in the original invitation, please see the following recorded Minutes and discussion points. For further information please contact Josh Agland – joshua.agland@parliament.nsw.gov.au

    1. Welcome and introductions;
      1. Mark, as an MLC represents the whole state of NSW. All NSW residents are urged to contact him with any issues.
      2. Success of animal politics, animal parties around the world.
      3. Attendees include representatives of Broken Hill Pet RescueRRANA (Rescue and Rehabilitation of Australian Native Animals) and local citizens.
      4. Greyhound Ban in NSW.
    2. Introduced Uncle Max. Uncle Max discussed the importance of Totem animals in Indigenous culture, the lores that protect Totem animals and his own personal experiences.
      1. Killing a Totem animal without seeking the permission of the Totem holder is akin to killing that person. A Totem animal is that persons skin.
    3. Updates on the Stock Theft and Trespass Review
    4. Wildlife
      1. Reports of hunters trespassing on private land, killing kangaroos illegally for yabby bait, Joeys kept in vehicles and dumped with wildlife carers.
      2. Now that water is flowing in Menindee, pelicans are being found with fishing line injuries, increases in native water rat drownings from yabby traps.
      3. Serious reports and evidence of landowners and NPWS using an insecticide as a animal poison. Lanatte-L is easily obtained in a concentrated form and is highly toxic. Reports of dog, fox, raptor and other meat eating animals dying from poisoning. Even Echidnas and insect eating birds dying from consuming contaminated ants. Local users call it ‘Magic’ as it kills everything. Various documents supplied to our office regarding this issue from local concerned citizen.
    5. Companion Animals
      1. Unanimous support for mandatory desexing. The problems with undesexed animals in rural areas is amplified due to resources and enforcement.
      2. TNR for free living cats in rural areas is not successful unless people provide easy and regular food to the cats. In populated towns TNR can work, however lack of volunteers/resources and education about free living cats is an issue.
      3. Mobile desexing services and programs, especially within indigenous communities is working, especially when indigenous people are part of the programs and can build community trust. More funding is required.
      4. State wide licensing system for all companion animals should be looked into, this has been implemented in other countries such as Sweden. Fines for non-compliance and enforcement needs to be robust enough to actually act as a deterrent for unlicensed animals, otherwise people may abandon an animal when fined and source a new cheaper animal (puppy factory). Our office to research similar programs for further discussion and consultation.
    6. Closing and thanks.
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    Mark Pearson, MLC, Animal Justice Party and Aboriginal Elder Uncle Max Dulu-mun-mun Harrison in Menindee

    Invitation to Broken Hill Animal Protection Forum

    In February 2016, the Baird Government announced the establishment of the Stock Theft and Trespass Review. This review held numerous public meetings in rural areas in which issues of trespass and both legal and illegal hunting were to be a main discussion point.

    My office receives numerous calls from distressed landholders, traumatised by illegal hunting trespass on their properties, it was for this reason that I was keen to attend a public meeting. I had already intended to visit Broken Hill, in order to address the information that had come to me regarding the disturbing rise in the serious egregious cruelty inflicted on animals in both illegal and legal hunting. I had also organised to meet key animal protection and rescue groups.

    Upon arrival, I was subject to hostility and defensive resistance from the Nationals member for the electorate, Kevin Humphries who insisted that I leave. I was frogmarched out of the meeting by Mr Humphries before I was even able to ask a question. I was not given the opportunity to raise my concerns regarding the brutality of hunting and its increased incidence on private property and how this terrifies land owners as well as terrifying, maiming and killing animals. It appears this National party member wants to obstruct any constructive discussion to address the growing violent culture of killing animals for sick enjoyment which in turn frightens property owners where these animals live or move through.

    I refuse to be shut out of addressing this appalling situation. As promised to the supportive local citizens I am organising a public meeting to address all the above issues as well as local pound reform. I invite any members of the public to attend the Broken Hill Animal Protection Forum to participate in a discussion on issues concerning animal cruelty, abuse and neglect in Broken Hill and surrounds. I have personally sent out invitations to Local MP Kevin Humphries, Broken Hill local Councillors, NSW Police Minister and Shadow Minister, NSW Local Government Minister and Shadow Minister, LAC for the region and Rural Crime Investigators for Broken Hill area, as well as all local police.

    A public agenda for the forum can be found HERE

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    Chair/Facilitator – Mark Pearson, MLC, Animal Justice Party

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    Special Guest – Aboriginal Elder Uncle Max Dulu-mun-mun Harrison, Uncle Max

    WHEN: Tuesday 6th September

    TIME: 7 PM – 9 PM

    WHERE: Broken Hill Community Centre – 200 Beryl St, Broken Hill

    RSVP by 2nd September 2016

    For further information and RSVP please contact: Angela Pollard on 02 9230 2445, angela.pollard@parliament.nsw.gov.au

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